Science Says these Two Things Prove You’re Smart

Intelligence, or IQ, isn’t what you know, but rather the pace at which you acquire new information. 

Longitudinal studies have shown that IQ is fixed at an early age, so you’restuck with what you’ve got.While IQ is far from being the only thing that determines success in life—research shows that it isn’t even the most important factor—a high IQ still isn’t a bad thing to have. In fact, I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t mind having one.

“The difference between stupidityand genius is that genius has its limits.” -Albert Einstein

New research provides some interesting clues linking early life experiences to, among other things, high intelligence. If any of the following apply toyou, you just might have a high IQ.


1. You’re anxious.

It’s hard to think of anxiety as a good thing, but evidence suggests that it might not be all bad. Psychiatrist Jeremy Coplan studied patients with anxiety disorders and found that the people with the worst symptoms had higher IQ scores than those with milder symptoms. Other studies havefound higher verbal IQ scores in people with higher levels of anxiety. And then there was a more complex experiment conducted at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel. Researchersasked participants to evaluateartwork presented by a software program and then triggered a fake computer virus, making it look as if it was the result of something that the participant did. They then sent the participants on an urgent mission to get tech support, only to throw yet another series of obstacles in their way. They found that the most anxious participants were also the most focused and effective at executing tasks. The next time somebody tells you to stop worrying so much, just tell them it’s your oversized intellect getting in the way.

2. You were an early reader.

A British study of 2,000 pairs of identical twins found that, despite their identical genes, the children who started reading earlier had higher IQ scores (both verbal and nonverbal) than their siblings. On the surface, this one seems easy enough to explainaway: the kids who learned to read early did sobecausetheywere smarter. But that wasn’t the case. The researchers concluded that learning to read early actually had a developmental impact—it made the kids smarter. So, if you were an early reader, it might not be because you’re smart. It may be that you’re smart because you were an early reader.

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